Ubique [oo-bee-kwe] – by Laura McEwan (2)

“Archives exists in the present, yet their endless “waiting without forgetting” locates them in the past.” Ubique [oo-bee-kwe] brings together eight dynamic graduating photographers from UCA Rochester in collaboration with REMLA (Royal Engineers Museum Library and Archive). In response to the archive the diverse photographers created individual works which shed new light on the historical material.

Follow the work of the students through their blog posts, and through a springtime exhibition.

Laura McEwan, Part 2:

I started off by visiting every charity shop in my town, then branched out to other places, collecting different vases as I went. I was really luckily, the first charity shop I went in had a large white vase, and I loved the shape! It wasn’t as standard vase, the only way I can describe it is wonky.

Round 3 at REMLA

It was on this day that I gathered all the Images I would need for my project, Danielle found the gruesome images that I had asked for with a nice surprise too. (I’m not sure nice is the right word to describe what I found, but in terms of what I was looking for it was perfect). At the end of the album were a collection of photographs of real human skulls. They had no identity, no idea where they come from just that I knew I had to include these photos in my work. I scanned the images in from the album.

The next stage was to spend many hours of doing tedious Photoshop work, shaping each image correctly whether that be squares, circles or triangles. Even before I decided on these shapes I was experimenting with other ideas. Once I had these all printed I began carefully cutting each photo out.

At home I prepped three vases, coated them in tissue paper and PVA, and painted white so they all matched (as one was pink).

To create my test piece (displayed above) I used tissue paper, photos from the archive and coloured inks, at this stage I was quite lost and it was just one big experiment, I was using colour for the sake of using colour. It turned out that I hated the outcome but now that was out of my system I could move on. Once I had received feedback I decided I would keep the vases white and that the colour was too much. The ink had run down over the photos and they became hard to decipher.

Once I returned home I peeled off my hours of work, to be confronted with a collection of blank canvases, a fresh start.